Best Flea Collar for Cats Buying Guide

Our Top Pick

Bayer Seresto Flea and Tick Collar

This flea and tick collar is the best collar in this Buying Guide and in our opinion, one of the best on the market in general. It boasts a sensational 8 months coverage (the active ingredient is released in small doses over 8 months), and promises to help in preventing in re-infestation by also repelling fleas and ticks. It seems to keep true to what it promises with thousands of happy customers, and we could not make a clearer recommendation!

Our Top 4 Picks

Ranking

Product

Our Rating

Price

1

Bayer Seresto Flea and Tick Collar

 5/5 See on Amazon

2

Hartz UltraGuard Plus, Flea & Tick, Cat Collar

4.5/5 See on Amazon

3

Hartz Mountain CHZ90745 Flea and Tick Cat Collar, 13-Inch

4/5 See on Amazon

4

Pet Gallo Flea & Tick Cat Collar

 3.5/5 See on Amazon

Why & When Should You Use A Flea Collar?

It is important to note that flea collars traditionally were only meant to be an additional tool in fighting flea infestation and is not meant as the only method or even the main method for treating a flea infestation. The flea collars on the market before were only useful over the span of a few days, and even then the beneficial effect was dubious.

Flea collars (both insectoidal and IGR) were meant to be used as a short term treatment, and according to The University of Florida, it should only be used for six days or less at a time and stored in a sealed jar in between use. New advancements in the field have been made, however, and the biggest representative of this progression is our number 1 pick, the flea collar from Seresto. It offers a revolutionary 8 months(!) coverage against fleas and promises to also help in preventing re-infestation, something that the older flea collars never could.

Cats and kittens older than 10 weeks can use flea collars. If your cat has any allergies or other medical conditions, consult with your veterinarian before you use a flea collar.

Types of Flea Collars

There are two types of flea collars – insectoidal or flea collars with insectoidal Growth Regulators (IGR). Flea collars that are only insectoidal. These kill adult fleas with pesticides but do not prevent re-infestation or continued growth of immature fleas. IGRs prevent new eggs to hatch into larvae and suppress the maturation of fleas into adult fleas. There are several IGRs on the market like Percor (methoprene) and XXX (XXX).

What Makes a Good Flea Collar (How did we score our picks)?

These are the criteria which we have judged the flea collars after as we believe that these are the most important factors for whether a flea collar is a good choice or not:

    • Does it protect the cat for an extended period of time?
    • Is it safe to use? *
    • Is it good value for your money?
    • How effective is it at killing fleas?
    • Does it help prevent re-infestation?
    • Does it use IGRs to prevent hatching or maturation of eggs or larvae?
    • Is it waterproof?
  • Does it have a security mechanism to release the collar if your cat should get trapped/choked?

* Every flea collar has a risk connected to using it. Your cat may get allergic reactions or burns from using the collar. If you suspect this to be the case, stop using the collar immediately and contact your veterinarian.

#1 Bayer Seresto Flea & Tick Collar

Our rating

This flea and tick collar is the best collar in this Buying Guide and in our opinion, one of the best on the market in general. It boasts a sensational 8 months coverage (the active ingredient is released in small doses over 8 months), and promises to help in preventing in re-infestation by also repelling fleas and ticks. It seems to keep true to what it promises with thousands of happy customers, and we could not make a clearer recommendation!

Pros

    • 8-month protection is unmatched among the competition. Point 1
    • Promises to also repel fleas and ticks as well as kill them.
    • The collar is water resistant.
  • Has a safety mechanism that triggers if the cat is stuck.

Cons

    • Some cats can have adverse allergic reactions or the collar can cause burns, which some customers have reported. This is, unfortunately, a risk with every flea collar. Stop using the collar immediately and contact your veterinarian if your cat shows sign of allergy or burns after using the collar.
  • This collar is quite a lot more expensive than the competition, but we believe that you get what you pay for.

View on Amazon.com

#2 Hartz UltraGuard Plus, Flea & Tick, Cat Collar

The Hartz UltraGuard Plus, Flea & Tick Collar comes in at a solid second place in our buying guide. It offers 7 months of protection which is just one off Seresto and it costs much less. This collar also has IGRs in it, which is a big plus as it prevents eggs from hatching and become larvae. More customers, however, reported the killing of fleas to be inefficient with this one, compared to flea collar from Seresto.

Pros

    • 7-month protection.
    • Has IGR, preventing eggs from hatching.
    • The collar is water resistant.
  • Has a safety mechanism that triggers if the cat is stuck.

Cons

    • Some cats can have adverse allergic reactions or the collar can cause burns, which some customers have reported. This is, unfortunately, a risk with every flea collar. Stop using the collar immediately and contact your veterinarian if your cat shows sign of allergy or burns after using the collar.
  • Some customers report that it is less efficient at killing fleas.

View on Amazon.com

#3 Hartz Mountain CHZ90745 Flea and Tick Cat Collar, 13-Inch

This flea collar is essentially the same flea collar as the Hartz UltraGuard, but the difference is that it does not contain any IGRs and as such does not offer protection against re-infestation. It is, however, still great value for your money if you are looking for another tool to fight flea infestation.

Pros

    • 7-month protection.
    • Very good value for money.
    • The collar is water resistant.
  • Has a safety mechanism that triggers if the cat is stuck.

Cons

    • Some cats can have adverse allergic reactions or the collar can cause burns, which some customers have reported. This is, unfortunately, a risk with every flea collar. Stop using the collar immediately and contact your veterinarian if your cat shows sign of allergy or burns after using the collar.

View on Amazon.com

#4 Pet Gallo Flea & Tick Cat Collar

This flea and tick collar from Pet Gallo is a cheaper alternative to the more established brands in this industry. It promises 6 months protection and whilst it is 2 months less than the collar from Seresto, it is still quite a lot of protection especially when you factor in that it retails at half the price of the collar from Seresto. Some customers have complained however that it is not effective for that long. While it is waterproof like the others, it is not a breakaway collar like the top 3 collars in this Buying Guide are, which is a negative.

Pros

    • Decent protection at 6 months
  • Good value for money.

Cons

    • Some customers complain about its inability to kill fleas.
    • Some customers complain that it falls off their cat or dog easily.
  • No breakaway Mechanism.

View on Amazon.com

3 Theories of Why Cats Are Afraid of Brooms


Meet Thor. He is a courageous cat that loves to hunt animals, climb trees and does not shy away from play-fighting with Freja. Yet there is one thing that seems to fill him with fear, his arch nemesis…the broom!

After doing some digging it seems like the most likely reasons are:

  • Sudden Quick movements & the sound created when sweeping.
  • Traumatic past experiences.
  • That the broom is seen as an alien object that creates unease, especially when in motion.

Since we cannot ask cats directly why they are afraid of brooms, we can only arrive at theories and not definitive answers. In order to come up with viable theories, we tried to understand how fear works in cats and why cats become afraid through information from science and experts on cats.

1) Sudden Quick Movements & Sound

This one is arguably the most obvious theory of why brooms are scary to cats and probably the first one you think of.

When we sweep the floor, we generally do so in a long sweeping motion that can appear quite sudden. From a cat’s point of view, what you see is this very tall and strange object moving as fast as a cat along the floor in a very mechanical fashion (meaning movements they would not commonly see in nature).

Some even theorize that the sound the broom makes is akin to that of a hiss. That hypothesis is difficult to test as it is hard to sweep the floor without making any noise, but it is an interesting theory nonetheless.

For the same reasons a vacuum cleaner is scary to cats because of the loud noise and sudden movements, it is at least probable that cats are scared of the broom for the same reasons. You may have noticed that your cat does not seem scared of your vacuum cleaner if it is just sitting in the corner of the room for example.

Animals (and humans) have the fight or flight response ingrained in them. And as a study shows, there are many factors that contribute to how an animal responds in a dangerous situation such as distance to safety, its health, physical factors etc. What we can gather loosely (I am not a scientist) from this is that each cat has different thresholds for when their flight reaction kicks in.

2) Traumatic Past Experiences

Just like humans, cats associate objects, sounds, smells etc. to traumatic experiences earlier in their life and might, therefore, react in a seemingly irrational way towards objects such as brooms.
We adopted Thor when he was 3 months, but since he was a “street cat” that had lost his mother (who either abandoned them or died), we don’t really know of any traumatic experiences he had before we got him.

Since he was out on the street for the first 3 months of his life and not around humans in a household it makes it less likely he has encountered many brooms, but we cannot rule it out in his individual case.

3) It Is an Alien Object That Creates Unease

Cats like all animals react on instinct that comes from thousands of years of evolution + personal experience. Your cat loves it when you mimic the movements of prey in nature with a toy during playtime because this plays to their instincts.

Humans have a greater contextual understanding of a broom sweeping the floor. When we see a broom, we know what it is, why we need to use it, and we expect it to be used in a sweeping motion and produce a certain sound. To a cat, a broom is, therefore, an alien object that does not resemble what they are used to in nature, and we can theorize that this causes fear or at the very least discomfort for a cat.

How to stop your cat from being scared of the broom

For this part, we will rely on an expert to explain how to proceed at removing the fear:

Don’t do anything with the broom near that cat for now. We will be working on that.

First, wait for the cat to be relaxed.

Then, approach him (or wait for him to approach you) and give him something he likes (there are cat rewards you can buy, which my cat’s addicted to). This makes him more confident near you.

After a while, get your broom with you and wait for him to be relaxed again or with you.

Put the broom far from the cat, but make it likely to him to see it. When he looks at the broom reward him.

Meanwhile, get the broom closer and closer. If done well, the cat fear will disappear.

If the cat fear is not to the broom, but to the sound of using it, make a second person do the sound in presence of the cat and use the same approachment system to make him lose the fear.

Nick Gutierrez – Expert in animal behavior over at https://animal.cat/